Peter Barnes, LLNL
August 9, 2000

Unpacking the EOS TPC at Fermilab

Abstract

The EOS TPC was unpacked (twice) at Fermilab during 25 July — 3 August 2000. This note describes the unpacking, moving, and repacking process.

Contents

Introduction
Moving the Crate
Opening the Crate
Rigging the TPC
Landing the TPC onto the Cart
Moving the Cart
Jacking the Cart
Recrating the TPC


Contents

 

Introduction

Moving the Crate

Introduction

During the period 25 July — 3 August 2000, we unpacked the TPC from its shipping crate, installed the cathode plane, and applied high voltage. Out of caution, this work was done in at Industrial Building 4, where we had use of a clean room for opening the TPC. We then removed the cathode plane, re-crated the TPC, moved it to our assigned space in Lab 7, and uncrated it again. This note documents the uncrating, rigging, and crating process. Separate notes describe the installation of the cathode plane and the high voltage tests.

After shipment from Brookhaven in the summer of 1999, the TPC and associated equipment were stored at the downstream end of PC4. On 25 July 2000 most of the equipment was rigged out of PC4 and delivered to our lab space, the "blockhouse," in Lab 7. The TPC itself, inside its shipping container, and the "blue giant" jack table, were delivered to the south end of Industrial Building 4 (IB4), along with the blue double rack containing the high voltage power supplies and anode currents monitor.

At IB4, we uncrated the TPC, placed it onto the jack table, and rolled it into the "CDF" clean room. There we connected the TPC to a flow of nitrogen gas, prepared the cathode plane, and installed it into the TPC. The preparation and installation of the cathode plane are described in a separate note. We performed a series of high voltage tests on the cathode and anodes, also described in a separate note. Finally, we removed the cathode plane, crated the TPC, transported it to Lab 7, uncrated it, and rolled it into the blockhouse.

There are several "phases" of uncrating and re-crating the TPC:

  1. moving the crate,
  2. opening the crate,
  3. rigging the TPC,
  4. moving the base plate from the crate to the cart,
  5. landing the TPC onto the cart,
  6. moving the cart


Contents

Introduction

Moving the Crate

Opening the Crate

Moving the Crate

Because of its size, the crate was moved by overhead crane, using long slings through the fork slots in the bottom,

and by large fork lift truck.

The crate has a front side, so we took care, when using the forklift, to pick it up from the back side, so it could be placed in the buildings with the front side accessible.


Contents

Moving the Crate

Opening the Crate

Rigging the TPC

Opening the Crate

The crate is built with plywood panels bolted to interior framing. To open it, we started with the lid. Starting with lid panel #1, we removed all the lag screws and the sheetrock screws along the interior edge, leaving the adjacent row of sheetrock screws, on lid panel #2, in place, so the 2x4 at that seam stays attached to lid panel #2. Then we removed the remaining two lid panels, leaving the 2x4’s attached to the panels.

Facing the front of the crate, we removed the lag screws, starting with the line of screws down the right side, then the lines of screws down the left side and bottom of front panel #1. We proceeded with the remaining two front panels, and the crate was open.

The TPC itself is secured at each end. The upstream end is bolted to an aluminum base plate. These bolts were left in the holes in the TPC for safe keeping.

The downstream end has two black angle irons. These are attached to the crate through the base plate by lag screws.


Contents

Opening the Crate

Rigging the TPC

Landing the TPC

Rigging the TPC

There are four lifting "C"s with turnbuckles that pick up the TPC at the corners.

The bottom of the "C" slips into a pocket on the TPC underframe. The jaw of the "C" has a rotating pin that slips into a vertical hole through the top of the pocket.

The "C"s are connected to turnbuckles. We attached straps to the turnbuckles with shackles, then looped the straps over the "H" spreader bar.

At the start of a lift, we put tension on the rig, then checked that each "C" pin was completely seated in its socket, before actually raising the TPC off its perch. When resting the TPC, we kept tension on the straps to keep the pins firmly seated.

To keep the straps from sliding off, we inserted shackles in the holes at the corners of the spreader. Once we got the load balanced on the spreader, we marked it with the locations of the straps, and marked the TPC with the location of the pick point. We were very careful to lift slowly and for only a short distance to verify that the load was balanced, so the TPC would not tilt excessively.


Contents

Rigging the TPC

Landing the TPC

Moving the Cart

Landing the TPC Onto the Cart

To get the TPC onto the cart, we had to remove the TPC from the crate and rest it on or near the ground, in order to remove the aluminum base plate from the crate. The TPC has three feet that allow it to stand on the ground without crushing the cooling tubes along the bottom.

The base plate was attached to the crate with four lag screws. After removing the screws, the plate could be hand carried by four people, leaving the crane attached to the TPC. The base plate has three recesses in the bottom that mate to the jack screws on the cart. The base plate is further secured to the jacks by a pair of screws into each jack.

After we secured the base plate to the cart, we placed the shim blocks, visible in the picture above, above the jacks, then landed the TPC onto the shims. Here, we took care that the TPC was placed so the shims did not damage the cooling lines on the bottom of the TPC. The TPC was not positively secured to the base plate or the cart.


Contents

Landing the TPC

Moving the Cart

Jacking the Cart

Moving the Cart

There are two pairs of pull/push bars for moving the cart. The bars bent near the forks are for pulling; the straight bars have notches appropriate for pushing.

All can be used to steer the wheels. We found that if the wheels at one end are not aligned, then one wheel tends to skip and skid, instead of redirecting the motion. The best technique for steering is for both pullers to coordinate their steering. The entire assembly of cart, base plate, and TPC is quite heavy, so once the cart gets moving it is not easy to stop quickly.


Contents

Moving the Cart

Jacking the Cart

Recrating the TPC

Jacking the Cart

In addition to the jacking screws, which can be used to level the TPC or change the height of the gap between the table and the baseplate, the cart has a built in electrically powered hydraulic scissor lift. The power cable and control tether are stored under the table deck resting on the wheel frame, at the end with the releasing lever.

The plug is a standard 120V AC plug. The startup transient is fairly jerky, but the ride after that is smooth. The release lever operates like a pallet jack: turning it opens a valve that releases the fluid, lowering the table. The release can be throttled to control the rate of descent.


Contents

Jacking the Cart

Recrating the TPC

 

Recrating the TPC

To recrate the TPC, we reversed the uncrating process:

    1. Lift the TPC off the cart and rest it on or near the floor..
    2. Remove the base plate from the cart and bolt it back in the crate. In order to reuse the lag screw holes, note the upstream end of the TPC will end up at the right end of the crate when viewed from the open side. The base plate has three recesses on its top surface which locate the TPC feet. The upstream end of the TPC has the pair of feet, so that end of the base plate should be upstream. Another way to check the orientation is to note that the base plate has beveled corners at the upstream end, matching the TPC.
    3. Nearly land the TPC onto the base plate. Start the lag screws through the angle brackets at the downstream end, and the bolts through to the base plate at the upstream end to aid alignment.
    4. Land the TPC and secure the screws and bolts.
    5. Reassemble the box in the reverse order. We found it easier to install a lid section immediately after the corresponding side section, when we could still reach inside from the ground. For the short ride to Lab 7 we did not install the sheetrock screws.


Contents

Recrating the Cart